Essays In Zen Buddhism

Essays In Zen Buddhism-75
Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966) was a Japanese translator, teacher, and constructive interpreter of Zen Buddhist thought to the West.Teitaro Suzuki was born in Kanazawa in western Japan on October 18, 1870.

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966) was a Japanese translator, teacher, and constructive interpreter of Zen Buddhist thought to the West.Teitaro Suzuki was born in Kanazawa in western Japan on October 18, 1870.

It was here that artists and thinkers such as Alan Watts and John Cage discovered the repository of wisdom which would later have a deep impact on Western culture.

Written in a simple and straightforward style, Suzuki’s essays are a wonderful introduction to the practice of Zen.

Suzuki returned to Japan in 1909 as lecturer of English at Imperial University and professor of English at Gakushuin (Peers' School). He remained at Otani University until he began an active retirement in 1940.

In 1921 he left these posts to become professor of English and Buddhist philosophy at Otani University, Kyoto, where he received an honorary D. During World War II he was under suspicion of the Japanese government for his opposition to militarism, but in 1949 he was made a member of the Japanese Academy and decorated by the emperor with the Cultural Medal.

Attaching primary importance to the last, he spoke of it as that characteristic which distinguishes satori from Christian mysticism, whose mystics emphasize "the personal and frequently sexual feelings." Using the term "unconscious" to describe the potential enlightenment within all beings, called the "Buddha-nature, " Suzuki opened the door for the use of Zen by modern depth psychology.

On the basis of Suzuki's interpretation Carl Jung presented the experience of Zen as the liberation of the unconscious.

Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki was one of the greatest exponents of Eastern thought in the West.

Born the fourth son to a Samurai caste family, his family lost their privileges in the late 19th century.

Since Zen has historically emphasized technique more than philosophy (zenmeans "meditation"), Suzuki's emphasis was not unfounded.

He spoke of his own enlightenment, But enlightenment, he continually emphasized, did not end with a meditational breaking through the limitations of thought.

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