Susan Sontag 1966 Essay No

Susan Sontag 1966 Essay No-26
Brown), the criminal (Jean Genet) and the transgendered (Jack Smith), the minimal (Nathalie Sarraute) and the maximal (happenings, Marat/Sade), the films New York intellectuals were talking about (Godard, Resnais, Bresson) and the films French intellectuals were talking about (The Incredible Shrinking Man, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond).The book ended with a declaration of a “new sensibility,” first proclaimed in the pages of Mademoiselle magazine, most of which sounded like the manifestos of a half-century before: Art today is a new kind of instrument, an instrument for modifying consciousness and organizing new modes of sensibility.

Brown), the criminal (Jean Genet) and the transgendered (Jack Smith), the minimal (Nathalie Sarraute) and the maximal (happenings, Marat/Sade), the films New York intellectuals were talking about (Godard, Resnais, Bresson) and the films French intellectuals were talking about (The Incredible Shrinking Man, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond).The book ended with a declaration of a “new sensibility,” first proclaimed in the pages of Mademoiselle magazine, most of which sounded like the manifestos of a half-century before: Art today is a new kind of instrument, an instrument for modifying consciousness and organizing new modes of sensibility.

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Kaufman On tap this week is Susan Sontag’s influential attack on a certain kind of intellectualist approach to art, in “Against Interpretation” (1964), reprinted in the collection (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1966).

The kind of interpretation that Sontag is against is not the common, largely unconscious variety that is always going on, in every engagement that we have with the world, but rather the sort that comes, consciously, from a specific theoretical orientation.

To take the work of art as simply something to be experienced, something to stimulate us, in various ways, is to render it unimportant and superficial, for it is to suggest that art operates on us at the least important levels of our nature.

But when we treat the work of art as the bearer of all sorts of hidden – and not so hidden – meanings, it becomes an object of literary or some other variety of interpretation, and this raises it up to the level of intellectual investigation.

Not just because by insisting on the interpretation of works of art, we reinforce the “hypertrophy of the intellect,” characteristic of a science-dominated society like ours, but because we rob ourselves of a much-needed source of experiential stimulation.

For one of the other features of our science-dominated – and industrial – world is mass consumption and the inevitable overstimulation that comes with it; an overstimulation that actually our ability to experience and feel.And it is in the light of the condition of our senses, our capacities (rather than those of another age), that the task of the critic must be assessed. We must learn to see more, to hear more, to feel more.Our task is not to find the maximum amount of content in a work of art, much less to squeeze more content out of the work than is already there.And the means for practicing art have been radically extended….Painters no longer feel themselves confined to canvas and paint, but employ hair, photographs, wax, sand, bicycle tires, their own toothbrushes and socks.Perhaps film criticism will be the occasion of a breakthrough here, since films are primarily a visual form, yet they are also a subdivision of literature.10 sheer crowdedness-conjoin to dull our sensory faculties.(“My greatest dream was to grow up and come to New York and write for Partisan Review and be read by 5,000 people.”) Her trip to Hanoi in 1968.The mini-skirted babe in the frumpy Upper West Side crowd and her years as the only woman on the panel.As Sontag says, near the end of “Against Interpretation”: Ours is a culture based on excess, on overproduction; the result is a steady loss of sharpness in our sensory experience.All the conditions of modem life-its material plenitude, its forms of narration.

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Comments Susan Sontag 1966 Essay No

  • Susan Sontag Was A Monster - The Grey Organization
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    It is almost incredible to look back and see how angry a theatre production could make people when Sontag was at the helm. W ith her debut essay collection in 1966, Sontag became a star in a way we can’t really conceive of today; and when her earlier essay ‘Notes on “Camp”’ 1964 was picked up by Time magazine, she was practically a.…

  • The Enduring Importance of Susan Sontag Jewish Journal
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    When I first read Against Interpretation and Other Essays 1966 in grad school, I fell in love with Sontag’s defiant excess and excessive seriousness – the very things that make her work.…

  • Susan Sontag LGBT Info FANDOM powered by Wikia
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    Susan Sontag January 16, 1933 – December 28, 2004 was a well-known American essayist, novelist, intellectual, filmmaker and activist. Contentsshow Life Sontag, originally named Susan Rosenblatt, was born in New York City to Jack Rosenblatt and Mildred Jacobsen, Jewish-Americans.…

  • The Other Susan Sontag The New Yorker
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    The Weil essay, along with pieces on Alain Resnais, psychoanalysis, Camus, and Cesare Pavese, appeared in Sontag’s first essay collection, which in 1966 boomed cannon-like from the prow of the.…

  • Sontag The Precocious Years - The New York Times
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    Jan 29, 2009. In Susan Sontag's journals, the intellectual items seem more naked and the private. Sunday Book Review Essay. In other words, no journal-keeping by a writer who harbors any sort of ambition is. Susan Sontag in 1966.…

  • Susan Sontag - Monoskop
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    Susan Sontag 16 January 1933 – 28 December 2004 was an American writer and filmmaker, novelist, writer of screenplays, professor, literary icon, and political activist.…

  • Susan Sontag Quotes Author of On Photography page 4 of 17
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    Quotes from Susan Sontag 'One criticizes in others what one recognizes and despises in oneself. For example, an artist who is revolted by another’s ambitiousness.', 'We are told we must choose — the old or the new.…

  • Critical Montages Sexing Susan Sontag
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    Less obviously political but no less important, the style of art, literature, and philosophy that Susan Sontag championed was the sort that resists reduction of a text to the personal biography of its author which is rooted in the same drive to discover the "truth" of a person in the "nature" of the person's sexuality, which must, in turn, be.…

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